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Global risks, opportunities and a new dawn for South Africa – Gordhan

SOUTH AFRICA (engineeringnews.co.za) - The global situation posed a number of risks, Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan cautioned on Monday. He was addressing the India-South Africa Business Summit. These risks include a new global financial crisis and damage to the multilateral trade regime, as well as the readiness (or lack of it) of countries for the Fourth Industrial Revolution, including artificial intelligence. The countries of the Brics (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) alignment could, he observed, mitigate against these. Also, new ways to grow economies, achieve sustainable development and reduce inequality could emerge. "Clearly, yesterday's skills are not good enough for tomorrow," he highlighted. Training the younger generations will be the biggest challenge for both India and South Africa. "Today, South Africa and India share many common factors," he pointed out. They were both members of Brics, the G20 group of leading economies, and the World Trade Organisation. But today both needed to "raise the bar" regarding inclusive development and reducing inequality. "In South Africa, ... we do indeed have a new dawn," he affirmed. "That new dawn has created an immense new spirit in the country." It had increased trust between Government, business and citizens. And that trust would be increased if the people experienced the benefits of development, such as the provision of water, power and the creation of jobs. Turning to his own por
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Extreme drought grips parts of South Africa

  South Africa's Cape Town, one of the world's iconic tourist destinations, could run out of water by April as the city's worst drought in a century risks forces residents to join queues for emergency rations. After three years of unprecedented drought, parts of the city have less than 90 days' supply of water in their reservoirs. "Day Zero", the date taps are due to run dry, has crept forward to April 22 as city authorities race to build desalination plants and drill boreholes. Almost two million tourists flock to Cape Town every year, with travel and tourism accounting for an estimated 9 percent or 412 billion rand ($33bn) of South Africa's economic output last year, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council. At a trial water collection site, similar to an estimated 200 the city may introduce, people queued to fill up their water bottles, limited to a maximum 25 litres of water per person, a day, officials said. Cape Town's mayoral committee member for water, Xanthea Limberg, said the dire situation was being worsened by some people ignoring a push for residents and visitors to use no more than 87 litres of water per person a day. City officials say dam levels dipped below 30 percent in the first week of the new year, with only about 19.7 percent of that water considered usable. Residents will have to queue for water when dams reach 13.5 percent. The impact of the drought has been exacerbated by the fact that Cape Town's population has